Day 16 – Celebrity maths answer…

Last week I put forward a challenge which virtually all the celebrities in the UK Big Brother house failed to answer correctly. You can read the original post here.

The question was:
dannyboybroderick-maths-problem-20140901

And all those who responded were correct with the answer of 120.

Clearly people who blog are more mathematically connected than our celebrity folk.

For those who weren’t sure of the answer, the trick in the question is Divide by Half. This is the same as multiply by 2, so:

50 divide by half then add 20 = 50 x 2 + 20 = 120

Well done to all those who answered.

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Day 9 – 93% of Celebrity Big Brother housemates failed to answer this

Normally I don’t spend too much time watching Celebrity Big Brother, especially as I don’t know most of the people in there. Ok, there are some:

Evander Holyfield, legend of the boxing ring
Lionel Blair, stage entertainer
Jim Davidson, supposed comedian
Linda Nolan, one of the Nolans
Lee Ryan, one of the boys from Blue
Dappy, the one from N-Dubz

But who are the others and why are they all jumping into bed with each other after less than a week?

Who is Casey Batchelor?
Who is Jasmine Waltz?
Who is Liz Jones?
Who is Luisa Zissman?
Who is Ollie Locke?
Who is Sam Faiers?

Perhaps I just don’t watch enough TV.

Anyway, onto todays task – I watched the end of CBB a couple of nights ago and saw the housemates answering general questions. To my delight there was a maths question, which they all got wrong. Someone might have got it right, but I must have missed it.

So here’s the question – post your answer below and don’t worry if you get it wrong, I’ll just put you in with the Celebrity maths group…Please don’t cheat and look it up…

dannyboybroderick-maths-problem-20140901

Day 7 – BODMAS, PEDMAS and the answer to Day 1 – Maths

Thanks to my followers for taking part in my Day 1 Maths problem.

Firstly, the answer is 5, using the usual BODMAS / PEDMAS rules of maths.

During one of my first lessons at high school, my maths teacher asked us all to get our calculators out and try out this calculation:

1 + 2 x 3

Anyone with a calculator showing 9 had to put their calculators away, and purchase a brand new Casio calculator that followed BODMAS rules. This was at the hefty cost of £15 at the time (ok, it was close on 20 years ago), which I’m sure was worth the money as it showed the ‘correct’ answer of 7.

BODMAS / PEDMAS

For those who don’t know or have forgotten, maths follows strict rules of calculation. Known as BODMAS (or PEDMAS in some regions), the order of calculation is:

B = Brackets (or Parentheses)
O = Orders (or Exponents / powers)
D = Division
M = Multiplication
A = Addition
S = Subtraction

Bod was quite a popular childrens program when I was growing up, so this was quite easy to remember – the cartoons are all on youtube! Using these rules our original calculation needs to be done as follows:

B: None here
O: None here
D: 4 ÷ 2 = 2
M: 2 x 2 = 4
A: 3 + 2 x 2 = 3 + 4 = 7
S: 3 + 2 x 2 – 4 ÷ 2 = 3 + 4 – 2 = 7 – 2 = 5

Brackets are used to clarify or indeed change the order of calculation, so:
(3 + 2) x 2 – (4 ÷ 2) = 5 x 2 – 2 = 8

For those who want a further challenge –

How many different answers can you get by adding brackets to the original calculation but keeping the order of numbers / operators the same?

I have shown you two –
3 + 2 x 2 – 4 ÷ 2 = 5
(3 + 2) x 2 – (4 ÷ 2) = 8

Don’t you just love maths!

99.9% failed – The answer to 3=18, 4=32 …revealed

Thanks to those of you who took part in the little maths problem last week. It was interesting to see the variety of answers coming out. I’m not sure how the first 3 were calculated, but I will try to explain some of the other ones…

1) 150

2) 180

3) 20

4) 152 because the units have a pattern 8, 2, 0, 2 and tens goes up sequentially by 2 – 1, 3, 5, 7. This give 8 = 112, 9 = 130, 10 = 152

5) 116 because 3 + 7 = 10, therefore 10 = 18 + 98 = 116

6) 100 because 5 + 5 = 10 therefore 10 = 50 + 50 = 100

7) 104
because 4 + 6 = 10 therefor 10 = 32 + 72 = 104

8) 10 clearly 10 = 10

9) And the most popular (so clearly wrong?) was 200 because the pattern is 10 * 10 * 2 = 200

UPDATED 25/01/2014 due to additional possibilities:
10) 62. To get this, you need to remove the equals sign and calculate the difference between the numbers – this difference increases by 4 between each pair of numbers. So, 432 – 318 = 114, 550 – 432 = 118, 672 – 550 = 122, 798 – 672 = 126. The next number will be 798 + 130 = 928, 928 + 134 = 1062. Now reinstate the = to give 10=62. Phew. Thanks to Tony Bialorucki for this answer.

11) ?. Yes question mark. If you read it as a set of statements rather than a question, then 10=?. Thanks to sik for this answer.

There are several issues with how this problem is written, which means you could end up with almost any answer given the correct logic –
First, it starts off with a statistic (99.9%) which is to entice you attempt an answer.
Second, the question itself is not correctly worded. It should go along the lines of ‘Complete the following sequence…’
Thirdly, the calculations are clearly all incorrect, so you could almost put any number down. The logic is deliberately vague

When I originally did this problem, my first answer was 160. This was because I didn’t read the question properly (a problem my 9 year old often has), and assumed it was asking for the next number in the sequence – 8 = 160!

So, what is the answer?

It’s 200, although I did like the 10 from The Penguin as this is the only answer which is true!

Sorry if anyone was disappointed, but hope you enjoyed the problem.

Like this post? Then check out more great maths books on Amazon